A Child is a Child: A Snapshot of Children's Health in California

A Child is a Child: A Snapshot of Children’s Health in California

As our nation and state’s child population continues to grow increasingly diverse, we must activate efforts and implement strategies that address the immediate and long term health and wellbeing of all children, regardless of background. Specifically, we must acknowledge the health inequities that continue to persist in the lives of marginalized children in California and in the rest of the nation. 

To provide a snapshot of the health needs of our children, The Children’s Partnership developed a series of fact sheets as part of its “A Child is a Child” campaign. This campaign unites a strong and diverse coalition of individuals and organizations to fight for the right of every child. Across issue areas, our shared resources, experiences and perspectives will help ensure a healthy and bright future for all children.

The fact sheet series will discuss factors that contribute to disparate health outcomes, such as food insecurity, poverty-stricken households, childhood trauma, along with many other systemic inequities that persist in the lives of marginalized children.

This research lays the foundation for a collective equity agenda to transform current programs and policies that ensure all children, no matter their background, have the resources and opportunities they need to reach their full potential and lead healthy lives.

Black Children’s Health Snapshot: February 2021

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We partnered with the California Black Women’s Health Project on a fact sheet that highlights how systemic racism shapes the lives of Black children, ultimately impacting their success and healthy development. It provides inequities data across health, mental health, housing, economic security, oral health, food access, and more; inequities that have only been exacerbated by COVID-19. Racism impacts every state of a child’s development and–as these inequities show–continues to harm children by shaping the conditions in which they live, learn, develop, and play. This Black History Month we celebrate Black children and teens and acknowledge that we must do more to support their health and wellbeing.

 

Click Here for February 2020 Version.

American Indian/Alaska Native Children’s Health Snapshot: November 2020

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We honor and celebrate Native American Heritage Month 2020 by highlighting the health of the over 200,000 American Indian and Alaska Native children and youth who live in our state. This month, with the fifth and final fact sheet in our #AChildIsAChild series for 2020, we partnered with the California Consortium for Urban Indian Health (CCUIH) [LINK] to highlight the inequities facing AIAN children in California and impacting their success and healthy development.

American Indian/ Alaska Native communities are resilient despite a legacy of historical trauma as a result of centuries of government-sponsored violence and discrimination, as well as dispossession at the hands of state and federal policies and practices intentionally designed to break apart culture, communities, family, and identity. Inequities in health are rooted in this historical trauma and persisting systemic racism that continues to impact the well-being of American Indian/Alaska Native children in our state. The data presented in the fact sheet will inform our collective advocacy to advance child health equity for all children.

Latinx Children’s Health Snapshot: September 2020

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We are proud to celebrate and honor Latinx Heritage Month 2020 by highlighting the health of the 4.7 million Latinx children and youth who live in our state. This month, with the fourth fact sheet in our #AChildIsAChild series, we’re uplifting the inequities that surround the lives of Latinx youth in California and impact their success and healthy development.

Latinx children and youth are a large and diverse population of California who navigate multiple intersecting identities, cultures, and languages. Latinx youth face disproportionate structural barriers as they navigate through life, whether it’s accessing health coverage and services, having enough healthy food to eat, or living in communities with the highest rates of environmental pollution. Latinx children make up 4 in 5 of children living in CA census tracts impacted by the highest environmental pollution burdens, are 1.5 times more likely to be uninsured compared to other California kids, and are more likely to have been infected by COVID-19 than other children. It is our hope that advocates, policy-makers, parents, guardians, teachers and others use this fact sheet to better understand where systemic inequities exist in order to be stronger allies to the Latinx youth that live in our state.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer+ (LGBTQ+) Children’s Health Snapshot: June 2020

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We are proud to celebrate and honor Pride Month 2020 by by highlighting the health of over 100,000 LGBTQ+ youth that live in our state. 

This June, with the third fact sheet in our #AChildIsAChild series, we’re uplifting the inequities that surround the lives of LGBTQ+ youth in California and impact their success and healthy development.

As the fact sheet highlights, LGBTQ+ youth face disproportionate structural barriers as they navigate through life, whether it’s living in a stable home, or being accepted, safe and protected at school. Over 75% of LGBTQ+ youth identify as Black, Indigenous, or People of Color (BIPOC), thus, any discussions about improving the lives of LGBTQ+ youth must also include dismantling structural racism that perpetuates the inequities highlighted in the fact sheet.  

It is our hope that advocates, policy-makers, parents, guardians, teachers and others use this fact sheet to better understand where systemic inequities exist in order to be stronger allies to the LGBTQ+ youth that live in our state.

Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Children’s Health Snapshot: May 2021

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In celebration of Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month this year, we are proud to partner with Asian Resources, Inc. to release our newly updated fact sheet in our #AChildisAChild series spotlighting the health of Asian American children in California. The data presented here underscores the persistent inequities faced by Asian American and Pacific Islander children in California. Of California’s nearly 9 million children and youth, at least 1.4 million identify as Asian American and about 97,000 identify as Pacific Islander.

Health inequities that exist within the AAPI community are understudied and overlooked at least in part because much of the data on this ethnically diverse population are aggregated, leading to a masking of differences and hidden health disparities between racial subgroups.

Citations

The Children’s Partnership collected Black children’s data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates, the 2019 CA Health Interview Survey, and the 2018-2019 National Survey of Children’s Health. All data is from California unless otherwise noted. Original data and sources are available here.

The Children’s Partnership collected AANHPI children’s data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2018 one-year population estimates as well as from KidsData.org. The data is disaggregated between and within AANHPI communities where possible. All numbers in this fact sheet have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Original data and sources are available here.

The Children’s Partnership collected LGBTQ+ children’s data from various sources. Original data and sources are available here.

The Children’s Partnership collected California Latinx children’s data in this fact sheet from multiple sources including the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2018 American Community Survey one-year population estimates, KidsData.org, the 2019 High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and others. All data in this fact sheet is from California. All numbers in this fact sheet have been rounded to the nearest whole number. Original data and sources are available here.

The Children’s Partnership collected data from the American Community Survey, CA Departments of Health Care Services and Social Services, KidsData.org and others, acknowledging that all of these sources fall short in describing the experiences of AIAN child health inequities. Original data and sources are available here.